Posts Tagged ‘ ei ’

Deviled eggs, revisited.

So I’ve made deviled eggs a couple times in the past few weeks since I first posted about them. The second time around, I thought I’d make them with quail eggs, for a nice twist. My cousin brought a ton (ok, maybe just a few kilos) of quail eggs from Cameroon, and so I decided I’d make them for an appetizer one day. It was probably the least enjoyable cooking experience I’ve had in a while.

Quail eggs have a high yolk-to-white ratio, meaning the egg white is super thin and fragile. Add to that a tough, tiny shell, and they are hell to peel. Even moreso, they are hell to work with once peeled, and it takes a lot of time and patience not to mangle them to bits.

The second time I made them was on Monday. They were really great, owing to the fact that for once, I actually had fresh chives, thyme and parsley in the house. The only thing I ended up substituting was white wine vinegar for sherry vinegar, but otherwise, they were tip top! They also gave me a chance to try out my new piping bag. I’m a long way from being a Cake Boss piping pro, but I’m trying.

Q: Where do you find information about eggs?

A: In the hen-cyclopedia

So this entry is dedicated to another staple for any home maker. Deviled eggs.

Deviled eggs are great cos there are so many ways you can adapt a basic deviled eggs recipe. You can make them as gourmet as you want, depending on the occasion. They’re also visually appealing. Pair some nice deviled eggs with a nicely patterned plate and they will be guaranteed to catch SOMEONE’s eye at a potluck. Make this with light mayo, and even those watching their waistlines will indulge.

I discovered the joy of deviled eggs rather late, I must say. It was last year actually, at an American Thanksgiving dinner in Korea. That sounds like a rather unlikely set of circumstances for a Canadian to be eating deviled eggs for the first time, but it happened. Fortunately, they were made by a co-worker of mine who was once a chef, and whose attention to detail both in flavour and presentation is as good as anyone’s. In short, I had some damn good deviled eggs.

I made them for the first time at Easter, since my little sis had never tried them. They got gobbled up fast. Since it was her last day of high school this week, I decided to make them for her again, since she’d asked for them a few times since Easter. I got a little careless and dropped them face first on the counter, hence the softly-smashed look some of them have… but shhh she doesn’t know!

I used Martha Stewart’s recipe, and omitted the fresh thyme and chives, since the grocery store I usually go to doesn’t sell the whole plant fresh. Obviously if you can get fresh herbs on the cheap, go with fresh herbs as opposed to dry. I also used less mayo than the recipe asked for… I didn’t measure exactly, but I feel like it was around ¼ cup. I found the yolk filling a bit too mushy last time.

Some good things come out of cafeterias…

While I was in university busy putting on my freshman 30, cramming, and dealing with my existential crisis, I also spent most of my mealtimes eating at the school cafeterias,  run by Sodexho (now Sodexo). Most of the food was pretty shitty. Mass-produced, overcooked veggies, undercooked pizzas, over-oiled and underspiced everything. It was rare to have a meal that was well-executed, tasted good, and wasn’t entirely bad for you. Some things I saw in the cafeteria just plain freaked me out… like the big bag of uniform egg used to make our omelets. That said, there were a few good food ideas I picked up from there. One of them is the feta and spinach omelette. Feta and spinach omelettes on Sundays were worth the pain of getting up early after a late night of ‘studying’.

I’ve changed it up a bit and made the omelette a little richer to fit my diet plan, but you can add and subtract and substitute ingredients as you please, really. Here’s what I use most days:

25g ontbijtspek (Dutch breakfast bacon)

30g fresh spinach

15g sliced or chopped onion

30g feta cheese

2 eggs

1 tsp olive oil

Yum!