Posts Tagged ‘ egg ’

Quiche.

The first time I made a quiche, I failed miserably. I had made a batch of mini pies in Korea, and had one pie shell left over, so I cracked an egg, threw in a few veggies and stuffed it in the oven. No milk/cream, no pre-baking the shell. It was a mess! The thing ballooned out of the pie shell and ended up looking like a prop out of a sci-fi movie. It still tasted alright, despite the dryness.

Fortunately, I decided to try again. This time around, I used a recipe that comes from Let’s Break Bread Together, the cookbook put together by the United Church of Canada.

I used the same pie dough from my previous entry on pies, making sure to pre-bake the shell for 8 minutes before I added in the egg and other ingredients. For some reason, the dough shrank a bit after the 8 minutes, so I ended up having to patch it. Next time I roll out the dough for quiche, I’ll make sure to take shrinkage into account.

Again, I don’t have the recipe book with me, but I think it goes something like this for the filling:

-1/4 cup green onion

-1 cup cooked shrimp, drained

-1/2 cup mozzarella cheese (I used jong belegen)

-1/8tsp black pepper

-3 eggs

-2 cups cream

-1/4 tsp salt

-1 tbsp dried tarragon

After the  shell has been pre-baked, spread the green onion and shrimp and cheese evenly on the pie dish. Beat the eggs, mix in the cream and add the tarragon and salt into the mixture, and then pour over the ingredients in the pie dish. Bake at 200°C for 30-40 minutes.

If the shell starts to dry out, wrap foil around the edges so that it doesn’t burn.

*          *           *

The quiche was an incredible success at dinner on Friday evening, and it disappeared pretty quickly once it hit the table. This prompted my decision to make two quiches the next day instead of just one. I made the shrimp quiche again, and I tried out a spinach quiche recipe from allrecipes.com, as I needed something for the vegetarians.

That recipe was not without its flaws–the original ingredient yield is enough for two quiches… thanks to the comments, I decided to halve the amount of ingredients from the get-go, and then for my cream/egg mixture, I just used the same one as I did in the shrimp quiche.

Despite all my adjustments, the quiche ended up having a lot of moisture–another common complaint about the recipe. It took me an extra 30 minutes with my quiche tented and on convection for it to dry out. If I make this is again, I might dry out my mushrooms beforehand or use slightly less cream, as it’s kind of hard to really get all the moisture out of spinach. Nevertheless, the quiche was a hit and by the time I got a chance to take a break from the kitchen, the quiche was gone…. marking the first time I’ve served something to others without trying it myself.

Conclusion: If you’re having a party or a brunch, quiche is a pretty cheap and easy way to fill people up. It’s a very versatile dish that can easily be adapted to suit a range of tastes and dietary requirements. People really love quiche! I will certainly be making quiche again in the future.

For now, I am off to Berlin! Going to finally try some curry wurst. I’ll see you all on Saturday.

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Deviled eggs, revisited.

So I’ve made deviled eggs a couple times in the past few weeks since I first posted about them. The second time around, I thought I’d make them with quail eggs, for a nice twist. My cousin brought a ton (ok, maybe just a few kilos) of quail eggs from Cameroon, and so I decided I’d make them for an appetizer one day. It was probably the least enjoyable cooking experience I’ve had in a while.

Quail eggs have a high yolk-to-white ratio, meaning the egg white is super thin and fragile. Add to that a tough, tiny shell, and they are hell to peel. Even moreso, they are hell to work with once peeled, and it takes a lot of time and patience not to mangle them to bits.

The second time I made them was on Monday. They were really great, owing to the fact that for once, I actually had fresh chives, thyme and parsley in the house. The only thing I ended up substituting was white wine vinegar for sherry vinegar, but otherwise, they were tip top! They also gave me a chance to try out my new piping bag. I’m a long way from being a Cake Boss piping pro, but I’m trying.

Q: Where do you find information about eggs?

A: In the hen-cyclopedia

So this entry is dedicated to another staple for any home maker. Deviled eggs.

Deviled eggs are great cos there are so many ways you can adapt a basic deviled eggs recipe. You can make them as gourmet as you want, depending on the occasion. They’re also visually appealing. Pair some nice deviled eggs with a nicely patterned plate and they will be guaranteed to catch SOMEONE’s eye at a potluck. Make this with light mayo, and even those watching their waistlines will indulge.

I discovered the joy of deviled eggs rather late, I must say. It was last year actually, at an American Thanksgiving dinner in Korea. That sounds like a rather unlikely set of circumstances for a Canadian to be eating deviled eggs for the first time, but it happened. Fortunately, they were made by a co-worker of mine who was once a chef, and whose attention to detail both in flavour and presentation is as good as anyone’s. In short, I had some damn good deviled eggs.

I made them for the first time at Easter, since my little sis had never tried them. They got gobbled up fast. Since it was her last day of high school this week, I decided to make them for her again, since she’d asked for them a few times since Easter. I got a little careless and dropped them face first on the counter, hence the softly-smashed look some of them have… but shhh she doesn’t know!

I used Martha Stewart’s recipe, and omitted the fresh thyme and chives, since the grocery store I usually go to doesn’t sell the whole plant fresh. Obviously if you can get fresh herbs on the cheap, go with fresh herbs as opposed to dry. I also used less mayo than the recipe asked for… I didn’t measure exactly, but I feel like it was around ¼ cup. I found the yolk filling a bit too mushy last time.

Some good things come out of cafeterias…

While I was in university busy putting on my freshman 30, cramming, and dealing with my existential crisis, I also spent most of my mealtimes eating at the school cafeterias,  run by Sodexho (now Sodexo). Most of the food was pretty shitty. Mass-produced, overcooked veggies, undercooked pizzas, over-oiled and underspiced everything. It was rare to have a meal that was well-executed, tasted good, and wasn’t entirely bad for you. Some things I saw in the cafeteria just plain freaked me out… like the big bag of uniform egg used to make our omelets. That said, there were a few good food ideas I picked up from there. One of them is the feta and spinach omelette. Feta and spinach omelettes on Sundays were worth the pain of getting up early after a late night of ‘studying’.

I’ve changed it up a bit and made the omelette a little richer to fit my diet plan, but you can add and subtract and substitute ingredients as you please, really. Here’s what I use most days:

25g ontbijtspek (Dutch breakfast bacon)

30g fresh spinach

15g sliced or chopped onion

30g feta cheese

2 eggs

1 tsp olive oil

Yum!